FEB
06

New Study Clears Testosterone Therapy of Cardiovascular Risks

New Study Clears Testosterone Therapy of Cardiovascular Risks

 

If you follow medical news at all, you may have heard in recent years that testosterone therapy could pose a risk to the heart. Recently, a team of researchers from Bologna, Italy, set out to prove or disprove this theory, which had been widely reported as fact.

In the recent issue of the journal Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy, the myth that stem cell testosterone therapy is bad for the heart was finally put to rest when researchers at Azienda Usl Bologna Maggiore-Bellaria Hospital in Bologna found that in healthy men the risk of cardiovascular side effects was no different for men using stem cell testosterone therapy than it was for those on a placebo.

So, what does this mean for bioidentical testosterone therapy such as the kind Dr. Foster uses in his practice? It means that if you were worried about the risks of this type of therapy before, there’s no longer a reason to be skeptical. Bioidentical testosterone therapy works, and it works safely, without the harmful side effects of treatments like penile implants, pharmaceutical drugs and injectable steroids.

If you or someone you know may have been hesitant in the past about bioidentical testosterone therapy and its effects on cardiovascular health, reassure them - and be reassured - that this therapy is a safe and natural way to restore sexual function and enjoyment without taking drastic, invasive measures.

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FEB
06

New Strides in Stem Cells for Stroke Therapy

New Strides in Stem Cells for Stroke Therapy

 

Stem cells have become one of the most promising and versatile treatment options around for a host of ailments ranging from hair loss to now treating patients who have suffered a stroke. The latest news comes from Spain, where medical researchers are working on a biomaterial that encapsulates stem cells. They are called silk fibroin hydrogels, and they have shown great progress in laboratory mice.

Researchers at the Centre for Biomedical Technology (CTB) at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), the Instituto Cajal and the Hospital Clínico San Carlos found that when injected into mice, these stem cells actually regenerated brain tissue, helping mice whose brains had been damaged by stroke.

Not only can the material regenerate brain cells, but it can also protect brain cells that are implanted into the brain. Previously, scientists had struggled to get implanted brain cells to survive once injected into the brain. This treatment could change that forever.

The study found that after implantation of the specially encapsulated stem cells, the mouse subjects showed dramatically improved motor skills as well as great improvements in their sensory skills, all of which had been severely damaged when the subject mice suffered their stroke.

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JAN
11

3 Awesome Benefits of Hair Transplantation

3 Awesome Benefits of Hair Transplantation

There are several ways by which people tackle hair loss. For many people, once they do a bit of research, they discover that hair transplantation seems like the best among all the options – and for good reasons. Find out why in this blog from Dr. Mark Foster.

1. Results Are Permanent and Enduring

Because the hair from your hair-restoration procedure is immune to the hormone dihydrotestosterone and its destructive tendencies, you get to enjoy hair that never thins and stays right where it should for long periods of time. DHT is believed to cause the miniaturization of hair follicles, which may contribute to male-pattern hair loss. 

Once the hair-replacement procedure has been performed, physicians normally prescribe Propecia or Minodixil-based therapies to preserve scalp areas vulnerable to the effects of DHT.

The permanence of the results from your hair-transplantation procedure will be the single biggest advantage when you compare this procedure to other short-term solutions.

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JAN
04

Stem Cells Have Memories, Too

Stem Cells Have Memories, Too

 

When you were a child, did you ever injure yourself in such a way you inadvertently taught yourself a lesson? For example, children who touch the burner on a hot stove likely won’t make the same mistake twice. Maybe you ate a food that went bad and it got you very sick - so sick that you refuse to eat that food ever again.

These behaviors are human nature - we learn from our mistakes. But did you know the human brain isn’t the only part of the body that learns from previous mistakes? That’s right - stem cells can "learn" from previous injuries, too.

According to researchers from New York University, stem cells have the ability to learn from past injury and adapt so as not to repeat the behavior that caused said injury again. Pretty cool, right? Definitely - unless the message gets mixed up along the way. Then, according to researchers, those mixed messages can cause a whole list of ailments, including chronic inflammation, allergic reactions and more. This helps them to prevent future injury and do their job to protect the body.

Even cooler? There is evidence to suggest that data collected by present generations of stem cells can be "handed down" to future generations of stem cells within the same body, all as a means to protect the body from harm. And this is more good news, because this means they could be used to design future treatments, making some of these conditions – particularly allergies – obsolete.

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JAN
04

Why Women Still Need Testosterone

Why Women Still Need Testosterone

It may come as a surprise, but normal functioning ovaries still produce testosterone along with estrogen. Most people think of testosterone as just the male sex hormone, but just like estrogen, its function goes far beyond reproductive and sexual purposes in the body.

Hormones generally regulate our body activities when it come to cells, tissues and organs. Although estrogen is more commonly known for its role in the development of breasts and the female reproductive organs, it also plays vital roles in other functions such as mood, sleep, libido and memory, as well as learning and attention span. It can also impact bone mass, skin elasticity, blood vessel dilation and our perception of pain.

Women Also Produce Testosterone

Most people are surprised to learn that women do in fact produce testosterone. This testosterone plays a role in managing libido and sexual response. It helps with brain function and behavior, strengthens the ligaments, and helps build bone and muscle, among functions. Like estrogen, this hormone also regulates sleep and helps to prevent cardiovascular problems.

Men and Women Both Need Testosterone 

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DEC
15

Stem Cells to Treat ALS?

Stem Cells to Treat ALS?

 For the approximately 6,000 people diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, each year, there is often very little hope. With no cure and very little in the way of treatment, ALS patients can expect to survive from two to five years following their diagnosis. But a promising new therapy may soon change all of that, and it's offering a lot of hope to ALS patients and their families.

That treatment is the safe and versatile stem cell therapy. A recent study in the journal Current Opinion in Neurology, titled "Stem Cell Transplantation for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis," states that though there is currently no approved stem cell therapy for ALS patients, this could all change thanks to new findings from researchers. Though researchers are currently unable to pinpoint the exact type of stem cells that would work best with ALS patients, they believe they have isolated a way to safely inject stem cells intrathecally into the cerebrospinal fluid. This has been shown to be a safe and effective way to reduce inflammation and protect nerve cells.

The study has now moved on to phase 3, which is human trials. Researchers are expected to conclude by July 2019. The speed at which the trials are being conducted shows great promise to both patients and researchers, as it further advances treatment options for ALS patients, but also further legitimizes stem cell therapy as a valid form of medical treatment.

To learn more about how stem cell therapy can help you, please call Dr. Mark Foster’s office at 442-227-0852.

DEC
15

Under Our Skin: A Stem Cell Breakthrough

Under Our Skin: A Stem Cell Breakthrough

 

A recent study out of Lund University in Sweden has isolated a way to turn skin stem cells into blood stem cells. If you’re wondering why they’d want to do that, the answer is a pretty cool one.

You see, skin stem cells are plentiful - not to mention easily accessible - since they’re in your skin. But blood stem cells aren’t as easy to use or access as skin stem cells, nor are they as reliable to use. That’s because once extracted they can break down and lose important properties that make them useful in the stem cell extraction process.

Blood stem cells also cannot be used to treat certain diseases because if the disease is already in the bloodstream, and thus in the stem cell already, it would not be effective. But in some cases, converting skin stem cells to blood cells shows promise where using straight blood stem cells does not.

According to researchers, with this new procedure it takes up to 25 days for the new cells to replicate, but once they are done, they are virtually identical to blood stem cells, even following the same process by which blood stem cells produce during the embryonic stage.

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DEC
10

Can Royal Jelly Be the Key to Stem Cell Therapy?

Can Royal Jelly Be the Key to Stem Cell Therapy?

 

With so many applications for stem cell therapy already in use, it's easy to imagine a day when more illnesses are treated by these powerful little cells. Unfortunately, stem cell therapy has stalled in recent years when many research projects found that mouse cells matured when they were supposed to multiply. But a compound found in something called royal jelly may change all that.

Royal jelly is a product fed to bee larva to help them grow. It is also what determines who is the queen bee in a hive - the bee who eats the most royal jelly grows larger and faster, winning the coveted spot, and the rest, as they say, is bee history. But now, scientists at Stanford are saying that royal jelly may be able to be used for more than just bees - it may hold the key to helping human stem cells multiply instead of mature.

The key is in a biproduct called royalactin, which is found in royal jelly. Stanford researchers discovered that royalactin was able to regenerate cells.

The royalactin (which has now been named Regina, which means queen) is currently being tested for treatment of everything from heart attacks to Alzheimer’s and ulcers. Regina could have broad but vital implications for people undergoing stem cell therapy, as it could vastly improve their treatment if scientists can replicate the cell regeneration effect in humans.

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DEC
10

Can Stem Cell Therapy Help Heart Attack Patients?

Can Stem Cell Therapy Help Heart Attack Patients?

 

A recent study by the Hubrecht Institute in The Netherlands found that, following a heart attack, adult hearts lack the necessary stem cells to repair heart tissue. This is especially troubling since most heart attacks occur in people over the age of 45 - in fact, the average ages of heart attack patients are 66 for men and 70 for women.

While a person is having a heart attack, a portion of the blood supply to their heart is cut off. This essentially kills off cells in the heart during the attack, and as of yet there is nothing that can be done to regenerate those cells. Stem cells have tremendous healing capabilities and can help patients with many different injuries and illnesses, but there is no data that shows that preserving or regenerating the cells that die during a heart attack would be possible.

Researchers on the Hubrecht study were able to pinpoint fibroblasts within the heart’s connective tissue that divide during a cardiac episode such as a heart attack. But those divisions cause scar tissue, which has its own purpose. Researchers found that when blocked, the scar tissue caused cardiac rupture.

The takeaway here is to live a healthy, active lifestyle to reduce your risk of having a cardiac episode such as a heart attack. Eating a balanced diet, exercising and taking good care of your oral health can all reduce your heart attack risk.

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NOV
16

November Is National What Month?!

November Is National What Month?!

It's an issue that doesn't get a lot of attention but affects 30 million men in the United States alone. Now, the month of November has been singled out as a time of support and awareness of a condition that many men find difficult to talk about, even with their partners or doctor: impotency.

It’s a common myth that erectile dysfunction is a normal part of aging. While it’s true that it is most common later in life, it’s almost always caused by a health problem that can be remedied. For some, hormone level changes are the cause, while others may be suffering from heart disease, hypertension or diabetes that could be linked to ED. 

Many medications can also cause ED as a side effect, and as you age you may find yourself on more medications than ever before. In fact, checking the side effects of the medications you are on is a great first step in discovering the source of your ED. If you find out one or more of them could be the cause, talk to your doctor about switching to other medications without this side effect.

Lifestyle factors can also be the cause of ED. Stress, anxiety and depression have been shown to directly affect sexual health in many ways, including the ability to get and maintain an erection. Smoking, drinking excessively and even weight gain can all contribute to symptoms of ED as well.

There are several treatment options for men who are suffering from this condition. It’s important to find out the source of the symptoms before beginning treatment.

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NOV
15

This Star Found a Way to a Pain-Free Golf Swing

This Star Found a Way to a Pain-Free Golf Swing

At 78 years old, retired pro golfing celebrity Jack Nicklaus, also known as the Golden Bear, is still in the game. But over the years he has had to withdraw from a number of tournaments due to back pain problems. He’s told sources over the years that he’s tried almost every treatment available to alleviate his pain and stay in the game, including surgical options with long, painful recoveries. But nothing seemed to work, at least not long term. That is, until he learned about stem cell therapy using adipose stem cells found in abdominal fat.

In the treatment process, adipose stem cells are removed from the patient’s own abdominal fat using liposuction. The retrieved cells are then optimized for treatment and injected into the "problem area." Experts believe this works because the stem cells begin to work immediately to repair injured cells and restore the health and function of the damaged area. These stem cells are unspecified cells with the ability to develop into specialized cells, tissues and organs. In fact, when cells are damaged, they send out signals to any nearby stem cells lying dormant that they are in need of their help to heal and regenerate. One of the best parts of this treatment compared to others for the same ailments is that it is quick and is an outpatient procedure, meaning patients can return home the same day.

In an interview, Nicklaus stated that the procedure was so successful he can stand for as long as he wants now and is golfing free of pain. He also says he will pursue stem cell therapy on his rotator cuff soon as he is now a firm believer in the use of stem cells to treat injuries.

For more information on stem cell therapy or to schedule an in-person or over-the-phone consultation with Dr. Foster about how stem cells can help you, call us today at 442-227-0708.

NOV
15

A Quick Switch Up Of These Food Staples Can Help with Inflammation

A Quick Switch Up Of These Food Staples Can Help with Inflammation

The most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects over 2 million adults in the United States alone. The pain, stiffness and swelling can make life extremely difficult and day-to-day tasks can quickly become too painful to bear, leading to a greatly diminished quality of life. Some osteoarthritis sufferers have actually found that changes to their diet can help improve symptoms and make life a little easier.

One reason dietary change may help with osteoarthritis is that it gives the body what it needs to be at its healthiest and fight to prevent further damage to joints. Eating foods that help naturally reduce inflammation is the key, as well as including vitamins A, C and E and antioxidants. Another important aspect of your diet is reducing your cholesterol and maintaining a healthy weight in the process.

Here are a few important foods to include in your diet:

No. 1: Oils such as extra virgin olive oil, avocado oil and safflower oil can help with inflammation and cholesterol levels.

No. 2: Dark leafy greens are a healthy choice no matter what ailment you face. They’re rich in vitamin D and high in antioxidants. This combination can help boost the immune system.

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OCT
15

Understanding Hair Loss

Understanding Hair Loss

Have you ever showered or brushed your hair and noticed a lot of strands falling out - followed by panic setting in that you may be going bald? If so, you’re not alone. Going bald is one of many fears held by both men and women as they age. It’s hard to know how much hair loss is normal and when it means there could be a problem on the horizon without in-depth knowledge of the hair life cycle and the ins and outs of hair loss. Today we’re going to give you the scoop on what the hair cycle looks like and when you should be worried about hair loss.

The Hair Life Cycle

There are three basic stages to the hair life cycle: the anagen phase, the catagen phase and the telogen phase. Not all hair follicles go through the same phases at the same time, which is why it’s normal to always be losing a little hair. Let’s break the phases down.

Anagen Phase

The anagen phase is the growth phase. Hair grows about half an inch a month on average but grows a little faster in the summer and a little slower in the winter. This phase usually lasts three to five years.

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OCT
15

6 Natural Ways to Help with Menopause

6 Natural Ways to Help with Menopause

Menopause hits most women like a brick between the ages of 40 and 50. Hormonal changes bring hot flashes, mood swings, insomnia and vaginal dryness, to name just a few symptoms. It can make life challenging, frustrating and downright exhausting for many women. Here are six natural ways to combat the symptoms of menopause.

1. Avoid Caffeine, Alcohol, and Sugary and Spicy Foods

These foods can make you feel even more sluggish and can actually trigger hot flashes and mood swings.

2. Try to Exercise Every Day, Even If It’s Just 20 Minutes

Research shows that moving your body every single day can improve mood, relieve stress and keep your mind and body healthier.

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